Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Rules of Composition

I loved the shoot I had yesterday -- I have said it many times, and I will say it again: I have gorgeous friends! Lexi was such a trooper, she modeled in a dress while in SNOW and cold without once complaining! She's the perfect model!! I love them!
(I have a lot more too, be on the lookout for a post with this session in the future! But for now, here are the ones I'm submitting for my assignment!)

I also want to apologize right now for my writing/descriptions... my brain isn't feeling very wordy right now. It's stuck on visual mode!

Rule of Thirds
This photo is a perfect example of using the rule of thirds, because the main point of interest (her face/eye) falls right on the intersection. To help create a visual, I have included a photo with the grid!

Rule of Thirds
Canon 10D, 50mm
Simplicity
To create simplicity in this photo, I made sure to have a background that was not busy at all. Instead of distracting from the model, you only focus on her! In addition to keeping the background plain, I shot at a closer angle to keep distracting objects from intruding.
Simplicity
Canon 10D, 50mm
Emphasis
This entire image is focused on emphasis -- by having my model stand next to a frozen lake (also covered in snow.. Yeah, it's been cold) and ensuring that only snow was in the frame around her, your eye immediately goes to that gorgeous girl. The bright red color of her dress only helps to strengthen the emphasis!
Emphasis
Canon 10D, 50mm
Leading Lines
The most obvious lines in this image are, of course, the railing to the bridge. However, they aren't the only lines! Every single line (almost) is leading to the model; the branches along the top, the shore of the river, the lines on the bridge she's standing on, etc... This is a perfect example of using lines to draw attention to your subject!
Leading Lines
Canon 10D, 50mm
Balance
Why is this photo balanced? Well, because her hair on the right side of the frame balances out her face on the left side -- both create a very 'heavy' feel, which balances it all out! (Also, her eyes are amazing. I had trouble deciding to edit this in B/W because of her blue eyes!)
Balance
Canon 10D, 50mm
Framing
While taking this image, I used all of the trees surrounding us to frame my model. The most obvious, of course, is the tree that curves over her head. However, the tree on the left hand side of her, and all the ones in the background, help to add a frame around my model.
Framing
Canon 10D, 50mm
Avoiding Mergers
This one was really difficult to take without having a merger... If I had her positioned just wrong, the spoke of the wheel was behind her head and she had a halo/crown thing growing out of her head. Not good! So I positioned both her and myself at an angle that the merger would not only, not occur, but would also be very clear that there wasn't anything coming out of her head!
Avoiding Mergers
Canon 10D, 50mm
Perspective
To get a new perspective than I had for the rest of the shoot, I decided to focus on this spikey weed thing (which are REALLY pokey, by the way) and have my model beyond the DOF. This still has a slight feel of a portrait, but thanks to the perspective it is not really (but I love portraits... they're probably my favorites)
Perspective
Canon 10D, 50mm
Harmony
To me, this entire photo is so harmonious! The lines, form, colors, etc... All work together. They compliment each other, yet still stand by themselves!
Harmony
Canon 10D, 50mm
And finally....

Rhythm/Repetition
The background in this photo has a rhythm and repetition to it, so instead of distracting from the model (or even just adding random blobs of color), the lines and repetition of the background add more of a texture, rather than a subject, in the background.
Rhythm/Repetition
Canon 10D, 50mm

5 comments:

Lena B, Actually said...

These are fantastic! I love seeing how other photographers interpret these photography ''rules.'' Beautiful!!

Walstad Company Productions said...

I love all your photos! The rules of composition are well used! My personal favorite would probably be the avoiding mergers picture with the wheel behind it. It's very interesting! :)

Sam said...

You were able to get high quality photos for this assignment! The bold colors of your friend's dress, hair, and lips have really great contrast with the snow and light setting around her. One thing that I did notice that threw me off was in the harmony picture. Your friends elbow is going out of the picture, and an effect was created where it seems like the two halves of her arm aren't connected. Other than that, you followed the rules of photography very well and it seems like you have a great understanding of them.

Mrs. Webb said...

I agree with Sam, the bold colors of the dress and lips and hair against the snow white background and deep and light browns makes for really interesting contrast.

I really like the no mergers photo with the radial lines of that wood thing behind her - that photo could have easily had crazy mergers but didn't. I also love the perspective and framing shots. Snow can be hard to shoot in front of because of overexposure problems - very nice.

Cameron Hartley said...

Thats some pretty vibrant colors you got there. It makes all of the shots stand out rather well.